History of GPO Building,Bengaluru

The General Post Office, can be described as a “modern classical” building, located at the intersection of Raj Bhavan Road and Ambedkar Veedhi. The GPO building complements the neighbouring Vidhana Soudha.

General Post Office BuildingThe Government had taken a decision way back in 1964, to construct a 24-storeyed building to replace the old residency post office building, to meet the increasing needs of the postal network in Bangalore. However, to fall in line with the Urban Arts Commission’s instructions, this decision was changed and a seven storeyed building was planned.

The new GPO building has been built on the land where the old Residency building served for over 117 years, and was pulled down in 1979. Built at a cost of Rs 3.5 crore, it has a plinth area of 1.2 lakh sq ft and can house 1,000 employees. The imposing podium of the building has a 40-foot tall granite pillar and a sweeping set of evenly grained steps. The overall height of the building is 120 feet. The building is imposing in classical design. The facade is adorned with fine-tooled, tall granite pillars and stone masonry. Nearly 200 hand-picked stone cutters, experienced in traditional temple architecture, came from the southern states to shape the building in 1982. The stones were quarried near Doddaballapur from where 300 loads of stones were brought to be cut and carved in Hoysala tradition.The GPO was inaugurated by Rajiv Gandhi on November 14, 1985.Technorati Tags:

Saudi univ, IBM to build superfast supercomputer

Saudi Arabia’s
upcoming King Abdullah University for Science and Technology
(KAUST)
has announced it will build one of the world’s fastest and most
powerful supercomputers in collaboration with IBM.

The
joint project will build and conduct research on the most complex,
high-performance computing (HPC) system in the region and among
academic institutions in the world, according to a KAUST statement.

To
be named Shaheen, the new system will serve the university’s scientific
researchers across dozens of disciplines, advance new innovations in
computational sciences, and contribute to the further development of a
knowledge-based society in Saudi Arabia.

Shaheen is the Arabic name for the Peregrine falcon which can fly at speeds of up to 342 km per hour.

India on the MOON

After a successful launch and orbital maneuvers, Chandrayaan has finally settled in its orbit and has just launched a Moon Impact Probe.

After a successful launch and orbital maneuvers, Chandrayaan has finally settled in its orbit and has just launched a Moon Impact Probe. It has successfully crash landed and has put the Tri-Colour on the moon. By doing so India has become the 4th nation in the world to send its flag on the moon.

The following are the images sent by the probe:

Moon's Surface
Moons Surface near Shakelton Crater
Moon's Surface near Shakelton Crater

The Mystery of Missing Gamma-ray Bursts

Gamma-ray bursts are by far the brightest and most powerful explosions in the Universe, second only to the Big Bang itself. So it might seem a bit surprising that a group of them has gone missing.

A single gamma-ray burst (GRB) can easily outshine an entire galaxy containing hundreds of billions of stars. Powerful telescopes can see them from clear across the Universe. And because the deeper you look into space, the farther back in time you see, astronomers should be able to see GRBs from the time when the very first stars were forming after the Big Bang.

Farthest GRB
Farthest GRB

Yet they don’t. Gamma-ray bursts from that early epoch seem to be missing, and astronomers are wondering where they are.The answer eventually came from Stan Woosley, a theoretical astrophysicist at the University of California in San Diego. He suggested that when young, supermassive stars with low metal content collapse under their own weight to form black holes, the stars’ rotation funnels the explosive energy into two streamlined jets that shoot out from the stars’ poles, like the axis of a gyro. We only see the burst if one of these two jets happens to be pointed toward Earth. The concentration of energy into narrow jets is why GRBs that we do observe appear so remarkably bright.

The first waves of star formation after the Big Bang should have produced plenty of metal-poor supermassive stars ripe for collapse. If true, GRBs from that epoch should be abundant. So where are they?

A New Kind of Pulsar

About three times a second, a 10,000-year-old stellar corpse sweeps a beam of gamma-rays toward Earth. Just discovered by NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, the object, called a pulsar, is the first one known that “blinks” in pure gamma rays.

About three times a second, a 10,000-year-old stellar corpse sweeps a beam of gamma-rays toward Earth. Just discovered by NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, the object, called a pulsar, is the first one known that “blinks” in pure gamma rays.The gamma-ray-only pulsar lies within a supernova remnant known as CTA 1 located about 4,600 light-years away in the constellation Cepheus. Its lighthouse-like beam sweeps Earth’s way every 316.86 milliseconds. The pulsar, which formed in a supernova explosion about 10,000 years ago, emits 1,000 times the energy of our sun.

The pulsar in CTA 1 is not located at the center of the supernova’s expanding gaseous shell. Supernova explosions can be asymmetrical, often imparting a “kick” that sends the neutron star careening through space. Based on the remnant’s age and the pulsar’s distance from its center, astronomers believe the neutron star is moving at about a million miles per hour — a typical speed for neutron stars.

Fermi’s Large Area Telescope scans the entire sky every three hours and detects photons with energies ranging from 20 million to more than 300 billion times the energy of visible light.