B N Raghunatharao: A legendary geologist

We are talking about Dr Raghunatharao, who was one of the first to identify the Mardihalli Pillow lavas (circa 2750 million years old) in Chitradurga district, which, subsequently, has been declared as a National Geological Monument by the Geological Survey of India (GSI).

He also identified banded ferruginous quartzite, volcanic bombs, volcanic chutes, volcanic plugs, ripple lava and other geological structures like the “subsidence caldera” in the Chitradurga region.

His work received public recognition in 1985, when Dr B P Radhakrishna, former director of mines and geology, Karnataka, published a paper in GSI Journal, highlighting the work done by Dr Raghunatharao.
Dr Raghunatharao conducted the geological survey of about 1,800 sq miles, walking on foot! He had mapped 1,200 sq miles of the area for his work on volcanic activity in Chitradurga schist belt. According to colleagues, the geological maps and studies made by him in 1953 are identical with satellite pictures taken after two decades. They have been confirmed by the work done in the area by other geologists in later years.
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History of GPO Building,Bengaluru

The General Post Office, can be described as a “modern classical” building, located at the intersection of Raj Bhavan Road and Ambedkar Veedhi. The GPO building complements the neighbouring Vidhana Soudha.

General Post Office BuildingThe Government had taken a decision way back in 1964, to construct a 24-storeyed building to replace the old residency post office building, to meet the increasing needs of the postal network in Bangalore. However, to fall in line with the Urban Arts Commission’s instructions, this decision was changed and a seven storeyed building was planned.

The new GPO building has been built on the land where the old Residency building served for over 117 years, and was pulled down in 1979. Built at a cost of Rs 3.5 crore, it has a plinth area of 1.2 lakh sq ft and can house 1,000 employees. The imposing podium of the building has a 40-foot tall granite pillar and a sweeping set of evenly grained steps. The overall height of the building is 120 feet. The building is imposing in classical design. The facade is adorned with fine-tooled, tall granite pillars and stone masonry. Nearly 200 hand-picked stone cutters, experienced in traditional temple architecture, came from the southern states to shape the building in 1982. The stones were quarried near Doddaballapur from where 300 loads of stones were brought to be cut and carved in Hoysala tradition.The GPO was inaugurated by Rajiv Gandhi on November 14, 1985.Technorati Tags:

India on the MOON

After a successful launch and orbital maneuvers, Chandrayaan has finally settled in its orbit and has just launched a Moon Impact Probe.

After a successful launch and orbital maneuvers, Chandrayaan has finally settled in its orbit and has just launched a Moon Impact Probe. It has successfully crash landed and has put the Tri-Colour on the moon. By doing so India has become the 4th nation in the world to send its flag on the moon.

The following are the images sent by the probe:

Moon's Surface
Moons Surface near Shakelton Crater
Moon's Surface near Shakelton Crater

History of Indian Institute of Science

It is time to remember the great minds that took part in the building of the institute. It all began with a dream for a centre of excellence seen by J N Tata. And relentlessly pursued by many scientists in the 100 years that followed. It is time to salute their efforts.

The Indian Institute of Science (IISc) is all geared up for its centenary celebrations beginning May 27, the day on which it was established in 1909.

Bangalore would have lost the prestigious Indian Institute of Science to Roorkee if it it had not been for the timely initiative of Mysore Maharani Vani Vilas Sannidhana back in 1901.

On behalf of her young son Krishna Raja Wodeyar Bahadur IV, the queen assigned 371 acres of land free of cost at Bangalore and an annual grant of Rs 18,000 a year towards expenses of establishing a research institute. That clinched the deal for Bangalore.

The fact-finding committee comprising Masson and Clibborn of Roorkee College had reported prevalence of enteric fever and plague in Bangalore. The climate was enervating in November, they added, and the power from the nearby hydel project (Sivasamudram) was hypothecated to KGF. Roorkee, they said, was more favourable for Tata’s Institute.

This was in reply to Prof William Ramsay who at J N Tata’s behest had toured India and found Bangalore the best place as it ‘does not present the same distractions as Bombay, Calcutta or Madras, but it is seat of a Geological Survey, of an agricultural section and of a government college and these would furnish a certain nucleus of scientific society which could not fail to be congenial both to staff and students of the new Institute.’

Interestingly, Ramsay had cited the hydel project with its ‘enormous potential for industrial development in which the new institute could play a vital role.’

He had found the climate temperate for nearly all the year; ‘it is not too hot for Europe nor too cold for natives’.
Bangalore was also favoured for a qualification it no longer holds! Ramsay was of the opinion that the place chosen ‘should not be in a very large centre of population, else social and administrative occupation from which it is so difficult to escape in a large city, would necessarily absorb the attention of the staff from their more immediate duties.’

Eventually Viceroy Lord Minto approved the establishment of the Institute, named Indian Institute of Science by Masson and Clifford, on 27th May 1909.

It is time to remember the great minds that took part in the building of the institute. It all began with a dream for a centre of excellence seen by J N Tata. And relentlessly pursued by many scientists in the 100 years that followed. It is time to salute their efforts.

Source : DECCAN HERALD