Photos of Old India and its culture

These are a collection of rare photos of the life of Indians in early 20th century .

These are a collection of rare photos of the life of Indians in early 20th century and their proud culture .

Imperial Airways London

The Imperial Airways ‘Hanno’ Hadley Page passenger airplane carries the England to India air mail, stopping in Sharjah to refuel.


Jama Masjid mosque

An aerial view of Jama Masjid mosque in Delhi , built between 1650 and 1658.


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A group from Vaishnava, a sect founded by a Hindu mystic. His followers are called Gosvami-maharajahs.

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Women gather at a party in Mumbai ( Bombay ) in 1910.


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A rare view of the President’s palace and the Parliament building in New Delhi


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A group of Dancing or nautch girls began performing with their elaborate costumes and jewelry.


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The Grand Trunk Road , built by Sher Shah Suri, was the main trade route from Calcutta to Kabul .


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A British man gets a pedicure from an Indian servant.

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The daughter of an Indian maharajah seated on a panther she shot, sometime during 1920s.

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Lord Macaulay’s address to the British parliament in 1835.




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Kosi River Flood – After effects

They used their livestocks to fulfill their daily requirements in terms of nutritional food and milk. But now having lost all their fertile land, they are left with their livestocks to make their ends meet as well as to look after their nutritional requirements.

In 2009 Bihar saw one of the worst floods in recent history.  Crops were devastated, lives were lost. Thousands of crore rupees were spent in relief and rehabilitation. Months have gone by and people have forgotten about the tragedy. What has followed after the floods as an aftermath is a 2nd wave of destruction through poverty, malnutrition, slavery, trafficking, etc..  People have failed to understand the enormous after effects of this flood.

Farmers who had land have lost all their crop. They are debt ridden now. Most have them have lost their shelter and savings they had. This situation is creating many interesting phenomenons in social environment of the region . Milk collection centers have  registered exponential growth in their collection stats. This is more confined to the regions which were affected by floods. But it wold be Naive to bask in the glory of this fact. The reason behind this is a very sad state of affair of a poverty struck Indian family.

Families before the flood used to sell their produce and make their ends meet. They used their livestocks to fulfill their daily requirements in terms of nutritional food and milk. But now having lost all their fertile land, they are left with their livestocks to make their ends meet as well as to look after their nutritional requirements. Sadly having failed to get any jobs, they are forced to sell the milk produced by the cows and buffaloes and sell it to the distribution centers. Even though it has increased the collection, this has resulted in malnutrition of their children and the whole family. They have been forced to survive on raw rice without the opportunity to buy the  vegetables due to lack of money. This is having major repercussion in terms of   overall health index of the region. People are falling prey to the diseases and anti social elements are taking advantages of this my inciting human trafficking and slavery. When the rest of the India is couping with 9% GDP growth, this part of the region is going back to colonial times. Unless people understand the need for long term rehabilitation this unfortunate incidents will continue to take place.




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Deepavali – Darkness to Light

These frames were captured with high exposure time and still hand. This resulted in spectacular formations of designs and colors.

These frames were captured with high exposure time and still hand. This resulted in spectacular formations of designs and colors.

Mysore Airport – Down Memory Lane

The Princely state of Mysore had developed an airstrip on the outskirts of Mysore by 1940, providing for landing of small aircraft. However, with the city being reckoned as the second fastest growing city in the State, the need for a modernised airport, providing inter-state connectivity is increasingly being felt.

CREDITS : Krishna Vattam, Deccan Herald

The Princely state of Mysore had developed an airstrip on the outskirts of Mysore by 1940, providing for landing of small aircraft. However, with the city being reckoned as the second fastest growing city in the State, the need for a modernized airport, providing inter-state connectivity is increasingly being felt.

Back in the Sixties and Seventies, no civic address presented to visiting Indian prime ministers, presidents or Union ministers by the City Municipal Council was complete without a request to the Centre to upgrade the airstrip. The then tourism and civil aviation minister Raj Bahadur, who participated in the Dasara celebrations in 1976, opined  that Indian Airlines could run small aircraft. He also held out a promise to discuss with the State government the possibility of having a subsidiary agency to the Indian Airlines to operate aircraft from Mysore. However, the State government’s emphasis was more on interconnectivity of tourist centres  within the State and had proposed the development of airstrips in Hassan, Bijapur and Ginigeri (near Hampi).

Airstrip history

The princely state of Mysore had developed an airstrip on a 290-acre plot at Mandakalli village, about eight kms from the city on Mysore-Ooty highway, way back in 1940. But, there were no scheduled services and Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru and later Ms Indira Gandhi were among the dignitaries who had used this air strip for landing. Small aircraft like Dorriers could land too. The Civil Aviation Department took over the management of the airstrip from the State government in 1950. In 1985, Vayudoot services were introduced between Mysore and Bangalore with three flights a week. However, the services were discontinued soon for various reasons, including misgivings abut its economic viability. The Airlines opened its online offices in Mysore and appointed authorised agents for issuing tickets to Bangalore and other centres.

In the last two and a half decades, Mysore has transformed itself beyond recognition. It has shed its pensioners’ paradise and sleepy city image. More importantly, during the last two decades there has been a phenomenal upward trend in the income levels of some sections of society, and they have been increasingly patronising air traffic.
The Karnataka government and the Airport Authority of India (AAI) signed an MoU on Oct 7, 2005, in what was seen as a Dasara gift to the people of Mysore, to upgrade the airstrip, so as to operate in the first phase 50 to 60 seater ATR 42 type aircraft. Later plans were made to handle operations of Boeing 737 and A 320 aircraft. However, there were some modifications in the project report and two run ways, instead of one, were planned and more land was sought to be acquired and a total of 174 acres has been allotted. With the first phase of the project having been completed at a cost of Rs 60 crore, the modernised airport is now functional. During Dasara, the Karnataka State Tourism Development Corporation commissioned chartered flights from Bangalore bringing tourists on package trips to Mysore. Another private airliner also operated flights during Dasara.

For time being, Mysoreans need to be content with mere chartered flights and have to wait for commercial operations to commence.