Chandrayaan-1 pictures

This is the picture of moon’s surface taken from lunar orbit by Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft’s Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) on November 15, 2008. Taken over the polar region of the moon, the picture shows many large and numerous small craters. The bright terrain on the lower left is the rim of 117 km wide Moretus crater.

This is the picture of moon’s surface taken from lunar orbit by Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft’s Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) on November 13, 2008. Taken over the equatorial region of the moon, the picture shows the uneven surface of the moon with numerous craters. On the lower left, part of the Torricelli crater is seen

India on the MOON

After a successful launch and orbital maneuvers, Chandrayaan has finally settled in its orbit and has just launched a Moon Impact Probe.

After a successful launch and orbital maneuvers, Chandrayaan has finally settled in its orbit and has just launched a Moon Impact Probe. It has successfully crash landed and has put the Tri-Colour on the moon. By doing so India has become the 4th nation in the world to send its flag on the moon.

The following are the images sent by the probe:

Moon's Surface
Moons Surface near Shakelton Crater
Moon's Surface near Shakelton Crater

Chandrayaan-1 Successfully Enters Lunar Orbit

Chandrayaan-1, India’s first unmanned spacecraft mission to moon, entered lunar orbit today (November 8, 2008). This is the first time that an Indian built spacecraft has broken away from the Earth’s gravitational field and reached the moon. This historic event occurred following the firing of Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft’s liquid engine at 16:51 IST for a duration of 817 seconds. The highly complex ‘lunar orbit insertion manoeuvre’ was performed from Chandrayaan-1 Spacecraft Control Centre of ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network at Bangalore.

Indian Deep Space Network (IDSN) at Byalalu supported the crucial task of transmitting commands and continuously monitoring this vital event with two dish antennas, one measuring 18 m and the other 32 m.